Fighting Economic Disparity

This message was in my email, today. It outlines some solutions to the economic disparity experienced by people of color in the USA, during the pandemic.
Dear All People’s Day friends,
Wednesday night Elliott and I were on an NAACP call that included Nancy Pelosi and other congressional officials who are trying to help in this time of need.  We learned that people of color are the largest group impacted by the Coronavirus.  Many are the most exposed because their jobs are considered essential and they won’t get paid if they don’t go to work.  Jim Crow laws hadn’t allowed them to save funds for a rainy day and stay home plus many people of color have compromised health issues because of prejudice against them in the health system.  I have heard many stories about this neglect throughout the years but no one has amassed scientific data.  Thus, people of color have the highest death rate from the Coronavirus in the US.
In the spirit of All People’s Day inclusion, here is a way you can help them and everyone in this time of need.
  • Call Governor Ron DeSantis 1(850) 717-9337
  • Senator Marco Rubio (561) 775-3360
  • Senator Rick Scott (202) 224-5274
  • Congresswoman Lois Frankel (561) 998-9045
Ask them to support the following issues:
THESE ARE ISSUES THAT WILL BE HELPFUL IN OUR BATTLE AGAINST THE CORONAVIRUS
  1. Expand Medicaid throughout the country
  2. Since people of color have the highest death rate keep track of racial demographics about people with the virus so zip codes can pinpoint testing sites.  Also, make public transportation to the sites available.
  3. Increase the amount of Food Stamps.
  4. In the next cash infusion: a) Include small businesses owned by people of color that have not been able to get the stimulus loans because they cannot afford to use a bank that requires a certain balance. b) Other institutions like Credit Unions should be approved for distributing the money. c) 501c3 nonprofits and churches should be treated like small businesses for the loans. If 75% is given to workers the business loans are forgiven.
  5. Vote by mail for all states due to the Coronavirus
PEACE & LOVE,
Susan Berkowitz-Schwartz
Founder / President of All People’s Day, Inc
(561) 495-9818
www.allpeoplesday.org (being updated)
Facebook.com/allpeoplesday
Instagram: all_peoples_day

Midterm Election Wrap-Up

White-WomenContemplate this: What the midterm election showed was:

  1. A large group of eligible voters is uninformed about the importance of their right to vote.
  2. There is a criminal faction among Republicans to disenfranchise voters who may vote Democratic.
  3. White people love white privilege and will do anything to keep it.
  4. Hispanic people do not understand that they are not considered to be white.
  5. We must find a way to wrench the power out of the hands of the White Supremacist Patriarchy that is heavily supported by white women who benefit in ways that people of color will never know or understand.
  6. Only white women can end racism.

Why Did 53 Percent of White Women Voters Go for Donald Trump?

To understand the “white woman story,” we must first acknowledge that white supremacy remains the prevailing force in electoral politics. 

These elections were not aberrations; white women have voted Republican for the better part of the last three decades. Women of color, black women especially, are responsible for the so-called gender gap in electoral politics and form the core of the progressive base.

Some white women face voting pressure from their more-conservative husbands, a dynamic Hillary Clinton acknowledged in her analysis of her 2016 election loss. 
whitewomenvoters
Investments in mobilizing newly activated white women must be the frosting atop a cake of much deeper investment in year-round organizing in communities of color – those best poised to lead and drive real progressive change.

[The Reasons Why White Women Vote Republican—and What to Do About It]

Donald Trump Holds Campaign Rally In Richmond, VA

Responses on FACEBOOK

Enock Mubarak wrote:

Unfortunately, many black people can’t see the forest for the trees because this midterm election is a win for black America because when black people took the house of representatives, we went from being on the menu to [having] a seat at the table.

On November 5, black people were sitting strapped down in the electric chair with the hood over [their] heads, waiting for November 6, when white America would pull the switch to literally legislate black people back into 1856 chattel slavery in real time. But,  once black people took the house of representatives, then, reprieve, good news, the electric chair blew a fuse.

For our victory, instead of talking about black people like we are not in the room, Trump [said] he regrets his heavy tone and will work on taking the bass out of his voice when talking to or about us.

In a war, there are battles. We have not won the war but we won this battle and, in victory, we won breathing room and a 2-year window to re-organize, re-construct, re-formulate, refortify, rejuvenate, regroup and rebuild without being under constant political gunfire from the other side. So, don’t waste it.

Then there is this . . . Who are the 8% of Black men and 18% of Black women that voted RED? Why did they vote that way? Do 46% of Latino men think they are white men? Do 38% of Latino women think they are white? Is any of this relevant?

votes by gender 2018

Other Victories – Takeover of House by Women Democratic Candidates

womenelected2018

https://wordswespeak.wordpress.com/2018/11/07/midterm-election-wrap-up/

Back in Florida!

After being uprooted from my lakeside apartment in Oakland Park, Florida, in February 2013, moving three times, with the last one being to Atlanta with my daughter, I am finally back in my beloved South Florida.

On the road home.

On the road home. When I crossed the state line from Georgia to Florida, something magical happened!

20151001_125910Now, that I’m back I know why I missed Florida so much.

First, there is the beach! The Atlantic Ocean was calling to me in Atlanta and I could not wait to get there. So, my first morning back, I got in my car, emptied of its cargo into the tiny bedroom given me by my generous brother. I drove over the Intercoastal to Palm Beach and immediately, I was caught up by the sea, sand, and sky. The beautiful clouds beckoned me to the seashore but I was not to be distracted by this dreamy moment because I was destined to arrived at the place where my second reason for moving back to Florida was.

20151001_165427-1

For almost 2 years, while living in Atlanta, I only saw my Dad (96) three times. I spoke with him almost every day. But this was not enough. I needed to see, touch, hug, and kiss my Dad.

Although he’s 96, he is alert, mindful, and reminiscent of decades gone by. He always asked me where I was, what I was doing, and how I was feeling. He always tells me to take good care of myself. Truthfully, it is my father’s counsel that has kept me from ever being depressed.

Upon returning to South Florida, I am able to visit him two or three times a week, now. This is such a blessing and I am ever grateful for having the ability to make this choice to return.

The thir20151003_140229-1d reason that I’m so happy to be back home is seeing so many of my friends. Lisa invited me to a luncheon with women the first Saturday I was home. I drove to Hallandale and really enjoyed meeting these progressive women.