HERSTORY

The voices of women are raising in an alarming quantity. Women poets. Women musicians. Women speakers. Women teachers. Women with messages that must be heard are stepping in the limelight beautifully.

For centuries, it’s been “a man’s world”. The tide is changing and the voices of women are rising with a message of harmony, sanity and peace. Violence by hand, gun, chemical, pure neglect is diminishing. We are happy people on Earth, again.

According to Herstory, things are as we make them. We make them peaceful. We make them harmonious. We make things from abundance that surrounds us. We are co-Creators with the Universe. It is ours to create within. We create happiness and peace.

Reframing His-story

OFFICIAL WEBSITE OF THE  INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENT

IYPAD goes unnoticed by media

2011 INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENT

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Afro-Latin Voices

Double Meanings

words (1)When a friend warned me about these two words, I was truly shaken because people say them all the time, while not understanding the OTHER meaning for them:

Bless – to condemn or curse (Source). Only yesterday, I was asked how I AM and my response was “I AM Blessed!” Then, a man walked into the same store and his response was the same. Are we, in fact, saying “I AM Cursed?” If so, I will refrain from using this term in the future and say, instead, “I AM Happy!” or “I AM LOVE!”

Nice – late 13c., “foolish, stupid, senseless,” from O.Fr. nice “silly, foolish,” from L.nescius “ignorant,” lit. “not-knowing,” from ne- “not” (see un -) + stem ofscire “to know.” (Source) I have always said, “Never accuse me of being NICE!” Now, I understand why I have this sentiment about this word. I would prefer someone say about me, “She is loving.” or “She is sweet.”

Use your words wisely!

 

How I Got To “No”!

How I Got To “No”!

©2014 Joan Cartwright

Miles and miles of people tugging at my nap

Saying how they need me, climbing in my lap

Figuring what I owe them, adding up their scores

Voicing their opinion about me and my chores

All these lonely people, living out their lies

Wishing they could be me, while they gloat and spy

Trying to forget them and their deceitful ploys

Waking to their sorrow and their constant noise

This is how I got here at this point of glow

This is just my story of how I got to “No”!

 

On The New Yorker “Satirizing” Sonny

musicwoman:

“Jazz is a marketing ploy that serves an elite few. The elite make all the money while they tell the true artists it’s cool to be broke.”

— Nicholas Payton (from On Why Jazz Isn’t Cool Anymore)

Originally posted on Nicholas Payton:

Sonny_Rollins

Charlie Parker died to play this music. Bud Powell died to play this music. After suffering through the worst holocaust in human history, these brilliant Black artists gave the world a gift. This gift was so potent that not only did it help them leverage some modicum of autonomy, but helped other oppressed peoples of the world find themselves. It even freed the souls of those who uprooted them from their homeland of Africa and enslaved them for centuries in a land not theirs. It is through Black music that White America began the process of healing itself.

I didn’t think back in May of 2005 when I was generously quoted in Stanley Crouch’s piece entitled, “The Colossus,” which extolled the virtues of Master Rollins, that I would have to sit up here today and call out the same publication for attempting to besmirch his character. I hesitate to write…

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My Song for Our America– a Poetic Essay

musicwoman:

He that hath an ear, let him hear THIS!

Originally posted on Ramblingroz's Blog:

I don’t call myself a poet, but yet I occasionally will write a poem. In honor of National Poetry Month, I will be publishing one or two of my works, and a couple of my daughter’s pieces (she IS a poet!).

This first submission is a spoken word piece I wrote for a show I performed in with my fellow Atlanta Drama Queens called Eclectic Noirisms or something like that, at Late Night at the Academy Theatre in Avondale, GA,  back in 2007.

Enjoy!

Roz

Glorify with me all the  bravests, greatests and firsts

Paid with turned backs,  exhile, stripped medals and other inexplicable hurts.

We’ve finished up King’s memorial,, now let’s go on to the next.

Put statues in D.C. of David Walker, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells, and, yes, Malcolm X.

I want national memorials for Colonels Tye, Turner and Brown

In fact ALL the fearless freedom fighters wh0 dared to take evil…

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